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State Supreme Court Leaves Marijuana Dispensaries’ Fates in Cities’ Hands

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SACRAMENTO-

To many, all the different choices of  medicinal marijuana just look like an easy way for the not-so-sick to legally get high for fun.

That’s far from the truth, says cancer survivor Richard Roberts.

“If it wasn’t for the herb, I would have never made it,” said Roberts.

Battling liver cancer and then recurring tumors since 2000, the software engineer wishes he could take his prescribed OxyContin and still function but he says it’s not possible.

“It’s just not conducive to do software on narcotics. Herbal gives me the ability to manage the pain,” said Roberts.

He already drives into Sacramento’s CannaCare pot dispensary all the way from Nevada County because of a patchwork of bans on these facilities.

He and others fear the reinforcement cities now have with a ruling from the State Supreme Court backing the bans will mean even more people will suffer without their medicine.

“We are crushed. It was a blow. I have to tell you I would have much rather seen it go the other way,” Lanette Davies with CannaCare.

Crushed yes, but defeated? No.

In Lanette Davies’ reading of Monday’s ruling – there is hope.

“At this point it needs to come from the legislation. They’re looking for direction from the legislation on how to operate dispensaries and collectives, said Davies.

With SB 473 and SB439 in the pipeline to better regulate dispensaries and give them special recognition in the law, she feels the spirit of Prop 215 will stay alive.

“How do you have safe and affordable access when you’re not allowed to operate within a certain city,” she said.

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1 Comment

  • malcolmkyle

    The following text is taken directly from the US government's National Cancer Institute website:

    * ANTI-TUMOR EFFECTS

    One study in mice and rats suggested that cannabinoids may have a protective effect against the development of certain types of tumors. During this 2-year study, groups of mice and rats were given various doses of THC by gavage. A dose-related decrease in the incidence of hepatic adenoma tumors and hepatocellular carcinoma was observed in the mice. Decreased incidences of benign tumors (polyps and adenomas) in other organs (mammary gland, uterus, pituitary, testis, and pancreas) were also noted in the rats. In another study, delta-9-THC, delta-8-THC, and cannabinol were found to inhibit the growth of Lewis lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, other tumors have been shown to be sensitive to cannabinoid-induced growth inhibition.

    Cannabinoids may cause antitumor effects by various mechanisms, including induction of cell death, inhibition of cell growth, and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Cannabinoids appear to kill tumor cells but do not affect their nontransformed counterparts and may even protect them from cell death. These compounds have been shown to induce apoptosis in glioma cells in culture and induce regression of glioma tumors in mice and rats. Cannabinoids protect normal glial cells of astroglial and oligodendroglial lineages from apoptosis mediated by the CB1 receptor.

    In an in vivo model using severe combined immunodeficient mice, subcutaneous tumors were generated by inoculating the animals with cells from human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. Tumor growth was inhibited by 60% in THC-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated control mice. Tumor specimens revealed that THC had antiangiogenic and antiproliferative effects.

    * ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS

    In addition, both plant-derived and endogenous cannabinoids have been studied for anti- inflammatory effects. A mouse study demonstrated that endogenous cannabinoid system signaling is likely to provide intrinsic protection against colonic inflammation. As a result, a hypothesis that phytocannabinoids and endocannabinoids may be useful in the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer has been developed.

    * ANTIVIRAL PROPERTIES

    Another study has shown delta-9-THC is a potent and selective antiviral agent against Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus 8. The researchers concluded that additional studies on cannabinoids and herpesviruses are warranted, as they may lead to the development of drugs that inhibit the reactivation of these oncogenic viruses. Subsequently, another group of investigators reported increased efficiency of KSHV infection of human dermal microvascular epithelial cells in the presence of low doses of delta-9-THC.

    * APPETITE STIMULATOR

    Many animal studies have previously demonstrated that delta-9-THC and other cannabinoids have a stimulatory effect on appetite and increase food intake. It is believed that the endogenous cannabinoid system may serve as a regulator of feeding behavior. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide potently enhances appetite in mice. Moreover, CB1 receptors in the hypothalamus may be involved in the motivational or reward aspects of eating.

    * AS A PAIN KILLER

    The understanding of the mechanism of cannabinoid-induced analgesia has been increased through the study of cannabinoid receptors (endocannabinoids), and synthetic agonists and antagonists. The CB1 receptor is found in both the central nervous system (CNS) and in peripheral nerve terminals. Similar to opioid receptors, increased levels of the CB1 receptor are found in sections of the brain that regulate nociceptive processing. CB2 receptors, located predominantly in peripheral tissue, exist at very low levels in the CNS. With the development of receptor-specific antagonists, much additional information about the roles of the receptors and the endogenous cannabinoids in the modulation of pain has also been obtained.

    Cannabinoids may also contribute to pain modulation through an anti-inflammatory mechanism; a CB2 effect with cannabinoids acting on mast cell receptors to attenuate the release of inflammatory agents, such as histamine and serotonin, and on keratinocytes to enhance the release of analgesic opioids.