Heat Wave Particularly Tough on Certain Groups

SACRAMENTO-

Being out in the heat can be downright dangerous, both for people who have to work in it and for people who have no way to get out of the heat.

Francisco Lopez was face down in the dirt when he got two water bottles from Jesus Soto – a good Samaritan who saw him a few minutes earlier from his auto shop Tuesday afternoon.

“He walked like a half block and fell down and got up and fell down a couple times, so that’s why I decided to go over there and give him some water,” Soto told FOX40.

Firefighters used a garden hose to help Francisco Lopez cool down and they gave him some lifesaving advice.

“We know you’re homeless, but listen. You gotta cut down on the alcohol. It’ll kill you in this heat, O.K.? Just lots of water and Gatorade,” Michelle Brown, of the Sacramento Fire Department, told Lopez as he cooled off.

Lots of water is also important to people who have to work out in the heat.

As a letter carrier, Eric Jones walks miles in the heat every day.

It’s his feet that feel the biggest difference between the mid-90’s and temperatures over 105, but even hotter than the walking is the driving.

In these mail trucks, the only air conditioning is the tiny fan on the dash.

Sacramento Police officers, on the other hand, have a new way to keep cool.

Just in time for this heat wave, patrol officers have received special devices that blow their car’s air conditioning down into their bullet-proof vests.

“The vests really keep the heat in our body. That’s the hardest part, trying to cool off after being outside in the heat. You can stick it between your vest and your skin, and it really helps you cool off a whole lot faster,” Sacramento Police Sergeant Steve Olivera said.

Meanwhile, heat waves like this are particularly dangerous for elderly people on fixed incomes.

“They can’t afford to keep the air conditioning running nonstop, so they have fans and their bodies can’t compensate in this kind of heat,” Brown said. “So without using air they’re having all kinds of complications, and some aren’t going to recover is the sad thing.”