‘Ghetto Tracker’ App Developer Defends His Product

TALLAHASSEE, FL—

Perhaps it was the name, or the pictures posted on Ghetto Tracker’s Facebook page that lead to people online being outraged.

It’s an online website application that allows users to input crime ridden areas. It’s not based on crime mapping data, but instead from user’s opinions and experiences.

The application grabbed national headlines and made the morning national talk show circuit.

Blogs talked about GhettoTracker.com being racist and biased, so FOX40 reached out to the developer. After a back-and-forth e-mail exchange David Foster, the apps developer agreed to Skype with us.

“My wife is in pharmaceutical sales and travels with her job … she doesn’t know many of the areas she travels too before she gets there,” said David Foster, the CEO of Hubze and developer of the program.

David Foster says that lead him to create the application.

It can’t be ignored that hundreds, if not thousands of people online were upset with the name, GhettoTracker.com. One of the pictures from Ghetto Tracker’s Facebook page showed African-American men with sagging pants — another showed an African-American family in a garbage can.

Foster says he delegated that responsibility to someone else to create and he didn’t agree with what was posted.

“I took that down and shut that page down as soon as I saw that. There were also questionable pictures on twitter that I took down. That wasn’t the intentions from the beginning.”

Foster’s been slandered, called out and deemed a racist. I had to ask him, is he?

“I am no way in any form a racist or classist or anything like that.”

Foster and I had a conversation about race in America and how removed we can be on the subject. I told him about my experience interviewing black men about what it’s like to be African-American in America. After the interview, it was clear that David Foster sees the mistake that was made.

“I see it like this, what if we draw attention to this area and a kid sees it and wants to bring change. He decides to create a neighborhood watch, maybe it will prompt change.”

The name, Ghetto Tracker will stick. The webpage is back up and Foster hopes to use this experience as a means of giving back to the community. If the app is profitable, Foster promises 20% of the profits will go to charities that are in impoverished communities.