2 Weeks Later, Napa Homeowners Fear Never Returning Home

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NAPA -

Christina Jaimeson is one of about 60 Napa residents whose home is still red-tagged after the 6.0 quake.
Two weeks later, concern has turned to desperation.

"I don't know where to go from here, I need some help...please! I'm sleeping in a sleeping bag. I have nothing," said Jaimeson.

The quake shifted the place she's called home for the past thirty years by nearly two feet.

She says no one will help her.

"Hut housing- they said the 5 thousand dollars they have as a grant...they won't give it to me because I need so much more than that," said Jaimeson.

Until she finds the $20,000 to stabilize her home, the city won't allow her to go back inside.

"They literally called the police and they were about to arrest me," said Jaimeson.

So she came to the local assistance center the City of Napa opened on Monday, as a last resort.

Barry Martin, the City of Napa's Community Outreach Coordinator says Jaimeson is not alone.

"We had 80 or 90 people in line waiting for the door to open. A lot of them had urgent questions about permits and how to start repairs on their home. Mostly residential families coming together," said Martin.

But as far as the city is concerned , Jaimeson's problem is out of their hands. Martin says it will likely take a potential state or federal program to help her.

Jaimeson doesn't know if she can wait for that help though

"When it starts raining, I will have everything lost," said Jaimeson.

She hopes that someone will be able to help, because she says the loss won't just be her own. She says the home is a part of Napa history and a stop along the Napa walking trail.

"It belongs to Napa, it was built in 1889. I'm just hysterical every time I see it, I don't know what to do. I just wish for somebody to help,' said Jaimeson.