Sacramento Islamic Leader Condemns Paris Attacks

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SACRAMENTO--

As he does everyday, Aziz Rehman prepares to enter the Mosque on V Street for a midday prayer session.

To him, being Muslim means being peaceful.

"If Islam is followed correctly, it is a means of peace and security for the whole humanity," Rehman said.

But on this day, there is concern some will associate the terror in Paris with his religion.

"Ultimately, it boils down to the humanity and as human beings, this is wrong. What happened was wrong," said Rehman.

ISIS has claimed responsibility for the bloody attacks, which targeted places people were enjoying sports, music and food.

"It looked like these people, they don't want to see the smile on the face of human beings because that place was full of entertainment," said Imam Mumtaz A. Oasami.

The Imam is concerned about the terrorists' association with his religion.

"This act is damaging Islam and they are not Muslim," the Imam said.

Many in the US are now fearful terror will spread here. Many states are trying to block refugees from Syria.

This year the US is slated to welcome 10,000 Syrian refugees. About 1,000 are expected to settle in California.

"It's one of the top states, or top two or three states, as far as total number of refugees that are resettled in the U.S.," Kirt Lewis, Executive Director of the Sacramento Chapter of World Relief, said Monday.

Lewis says hundreds of refugees will likely come to Sacramento, after enduring a thorough screening process.

The Imam says he supports the U.S.'s actions.

"Whatever is best interest of United States, all Muslims in the U.S. have to stand for that," he said.

As he and Rehman pray this week, they say the victims of last week's attacks will be in their thoughts.