Investigation in Bunny Friend Playground Shooting Limps Forward

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(CNN) — With hundreds of people standing around them, two groups opened fire on each other at a New Orleans playground last month. Though none of the 17 people who were injured have died, the city has likened it to a terror attack.

Since then, police have been on a tear to get the shooters from the November 22 gun battle at Bunny Friend Playground.

But it’s been a tough haul. Despite the fact that up to 500 people were at the playground when the bullets flew, witnesses have been slow to come forward.

Dearth of witness calls

On the day of the shooting, Bunny Friend Playground overflowed with hundreds of revelers wanting to join the filming of an impromptu music video.

Police responded to break up the gathering. They were a block away when they heard the gunfire. But by the time they got to the park, the shooters appeared to be gone.

“Witnesses told police that both groups left the park on foot immediately after the shooting,” police said.

Police had counted on people to post cell phone videos to social media, which may have offered some clues. But investigators were hard pressed to find any.

A Crimestoppers representative said she was so disappointed by the dearth of calls coming in that her agency upped its reward to $5,000.

Mayor: ‘You can’t hide’

So far, five suspects have been taken into custody. But three are still out there.

Police have tweeted out their names and photos, telling them to come forward.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu has vowed to get them all.

“You can’t run; you can’t hide. We’re going to find you,” he said after the incident. “We’re going to prosecute you. We’re going to hold you accountable, and we’re going to put you behind bars.”

In a city chronically plagued by and sick of gun violence, citizens have pressured the mayor to do more, and he has focused in on this case.

“One of the grandmothers told me…’You know, it’s a damned shame that young kids can’t even breath fresh air at the playground,'” Landrieu said.