87-Year-Old Becomes U.S. Citizen So He Can Vote in November

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SACRAMENTO -- Wednesday, at the Memorial Auditorium in Sacramento, more than a thousand people from all over the world took the oath to become American citizen.

FOX40 spoke with one 87-year-old who did it just so he could vote this November.

Washington Espinoza has lived in the United States for the last 30 years, but the Ecuadorian immigrant said he never felt compelled to become a citizen -- until now.

His son, Pablo, translated for him.

"My dad's a Hillary fan for a very long time, and he's definitely no fan of Donald Trump. And he said he wanted to keep that crazy guy from becoming president," Pablo Espinoza said.

Washington Espinoza isn't alone.

According to the New York Times, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and his stance on immigration has led to a surge in applications for U.S. citizenship by many Latino immigrants, many of them rushing to take the oath in time to vote in November.

"This year's really important. My dad, eight months ago asked if I could help him become a citizen because he really wanted to vote, really wanted to participate," Pablo Espinoza said.

Because Washington Espinoza is over 65 years old and has been a legal resident of the U.S. for the last 20 years, he only had to answer 25 questions on his citizenship test. He's proud -- he only missed one.

"For me, it's incredibly important, we were raised to be active citizens. And in Ecuador, where we're from, I never missed an election since I was able to, and my dad didn't either," Espinoza said.

And so Wednesday, surrounded by more than a thousand other immigrants, with the help of his son, Washington Espinoza raised his right hand and took the oath of allegiance.

"For me it's super emotional, I was just telling my son, this is the second time that he's been at a ceremony like this, because he's 18 now, but when he was 2, it was my turn," Pablo Espinoza said.

Shortly after the ceremony, Washington Espinoza registered to vote.