A Look at the All-New McKinley Village

SACRAMENTO -- This coming weekend marks the open house for the city's newest and most anticipated community.

McKinley Village, just off Business 80 near Cal Expo, is its own little island, so to speak. Nearly 50 acres of land that is truly separate from the rest of East Sacramento.

"We've paid a lot of attention to detail to try and create a very unique neighborhood, but one that also reflects the heritage of Sacramento," explained investor Phil Angelides.

But it's more than just the front porches and tree-lined streets that make McKinley Village unique.

The big reveal begins with a newly constructed underpass, leading you right to the community that is still under construction. The underpass will be lit up at night with a variety of colors, but its main focus will be to connect McKinley Village with its surrounding communities.

"Three hundred thirty-six homes for the community, and of that there will be five separate neighborhoods," explained home builder Kevin Carson. "We're creating a neighborhood and appealing to a wide variety of people, and it's all here right now."

The first homes at McKinley Village will be for sale by the end of the month. By the end of the year, the first families will be moving in.

"You know, nothing is cookie-cutter here," said Angelides. "Highly energy-efficient, modern, open floor plans, lots of bedrooms, walk-in closets. The kinds of things people want today, but are very hard to find in the older neighborhoods."

And it's true. The hook is variety at McKinley Village. From 1,300-square-foot homes to 3,100. Prices range from $350,000 to $900,000. Plus residents will have access to a state-of-the-art clubhouse, swimming pool and weight room.

"We really tried to capture bedroom count, and bathroom count and living space -- areas that appeal to a wide variety of buyers," said Carson.

McKinley Village has been one of the most significant investments for the city in the last decade. With a price tag of $190 million, it wasn't without its challenges either.

A 14-foot-high sound wall was built to keep freeway noise to a minimum, trains motor right by the community several times a day, and the former agricultural site is largely sequestered from everything else.

"We're taking a big bet on Sacramento, but we believe we've done the right thing here," said Angelides.

Time will tell if he's right.