Roseville Twins Share Story of One Being Granted DACA Status While the Other Was Denied

ROSEVILLE -- Twins Ruben and Ramiro Silva are 16 years old, and have lived in Roseville most of their lives.

They were brought into the country illegally when they were 4.

The Silva twins have done everything together, from soccer to school dances -- but one major hurdle threatened to separate them.

They both started the DACA process in 2015 and it wasn’t till 2016 that Ramiro was granted DACA status. Ruben was denied.

Both have lived basically the same life experiences up to this point which is why the family was so surprised that one was granted and the other denied.

"What would happen if I somehow got taken away from my family?" Ruben said. "I got really scared."

In order to get DACA status, applicants now have to show proof for every single month they’ve been in the U.S.. Anything from school report cards, to medical records, to dated pictures. In addition to this, each needs to pass a criminal background check, get a fingerprint at the consulate, and show evidence that they’re working or going to school.

"It seems no matter how much evidence we've been furnishing, even school records showing they attended school, we're getting requests for further evidence," immigration attorney Douglas Lehrman said.

Ruben says there were a few months in the summer of one of his elementary school years when he had no school documents to show. This is what led to his application being denied.

"I thought it was weird, having the same information, having the same life experiences," Ramiro said.

After months of appealing and attorney meetings, Ruben's DACA application was finally also granted.

But his relief was short lived. In September, the Trump Administration announced it was ending the DACA program.

Now, both brothers are once again thrust into legal limbo in the only country they've ever known.

"I've been saluting to the American flag from a very young age," Ruben said. "I consider this my country too."