Turlock City Council Discusses Anti-Hate Resolution

TURLOCK -- "I kinda had to look up what the alt-right stood for and their white supremacist beliefs, so," said Danielle Ray-Reyes.

Once Ray-Reyes researched the stickers popping up in her Turlock neighborhood, she started ripping them down.

"Me and my husband were like, 'oh my gosh, they're everywhere," she said.

There were hundreds of them, she said.

On stop signs. And light poles. Near high schools and homes.

The stickers are sold as a $4 "Alt Right Starter Pack" on NathanDamigo.com. Damigo is the former face of Identity Evropa, a white nationalist group based in Oakdale who recently spread his message in Charlottesville.

Ray-Reyes is demanding action -- urging the Turlock City Council to adopt a resolution denouncing hate activity and urging police to investigate people defacing public property with the stickers.

"When Hitler came to power, people were real docile. They didn't fight back, this is different times," Francisco Reyes said.

Donna Henley's father fought in World War II.

"I never thought this would happen in my town. We need to do something as a community," Henley said.

As a community, Turlock can issue citations. The city has a municipal code against unlawful advertising that says: "It is unlawful for any person to disfigure or paint, affix or attach ... any advertisement, paper or poster to any public property."

The police department, however, says that it is not unlawful for people to rip those stickers or signs down.

"I agree. Turlock is better than this," Turlock Mayor Gary Soiseth said.

Joining council on a conference call Tuesday night, the mayor of Turlock said he would take a serious look at the resolution.

"Turlock stands against bigotry and discrimination," he said.

Though council could not vote on the matter Thursday night, the fact that the mayor did not stay silent spoke volumes to Ray-Reyes about the town she's teaching and raising her children in.

“And I say to the white supremacists, not in my town not in our city, not for my children,” Ray-Reyes said.