Click here to help the Salvation Army this Holiday Season

Amazon Announces New Service That Lets Couriers Place Packages Inside Your Home

ROSEVILLE -- It's getting to be that time of year, the season when boxes start to pile up on porches and social media gets flooded with videos of thieves getting away with deliveries before homeowners can claim them. Roseville Police are already on alert.

"But they need to make sure deliver to their place of work, neighbor's house or a secure facility such as an Amazon locker," Det. Rob Pratt with the Roseville Police Department said.

But Wednesday Amazon announced a new option: Amazon Key -- an electronic service that would allow couriers to place packages inside a customer's home.

Customers would have to purchase an Amazon cloud compatible door lock and camera system at a base price of $250. According to a news release from Amazon, when couriers request access to a home, Amazon verifies they are in the right place and unlocks the door electronically, allowing the courier to drop off the package. The whole process is recorded.

"You have to get used to the fact that you're on camera, but we've adapted to that," said Roseville resident Marie Redluss.

Redluss says she has a door lock system that works in a very similar way to Amazon Key -- only she, not a third party, controls access to her home -- and she loves it.

"I think if I didn't already have this I think [the Amazon Key is] a great option, especially purchasing a lot of stuff online," Redluss said.

"What is to say they can't be corrupted? Do other things with it?" said Roseville resident Misty Bain.

But Bain, who gets regular Amazon deliveries, isn't open to a company allowing strangers access to her home.

"They use private carriers, so I don't know if I would be comfortable having anyone in an unmarked car just walking to my house," Bain said.

Roseville police do encourage residents to make plans for how they will keep their packages safe this holiday season. He was not very familiar with Amazon Key, but from a general law enforcement perspective he suggested people make sure to ask Amazon a lot of questions.

"If a person has access to your home, who is that person? Do they have background checks? How long do they have access to your home and does that access get denied after certain amount of time?" Pratt said.