‘Everytown Gun Safety’ Holds Vigil Following Mass Shootings

SACRAMENTO -- As bullets strafed through a Vegas concert venue and riddled a small church in Sutherland Springs, Texas,  Jena Grosser felt them ricochet through her life.

"My aunt and my uncle were involved in a murder-suicide. He killed my aunt and then himself. It wasn't something that we were expecting and what-not, but access to a gun, mental health issues really played a role into it," she said.

Grosser and about two dozen others brought their pain and their purpose to the state Capitol on Wednesday night, hoping to send a message to Congress.

Enough is enough they say.

They believe federal gun laws need to be fortified to prevent more people from being targeted by weapons meant to do the most damage with the most speed.

They point to the success of California law.

"Law enforcement discretion to ensure that concealed carry weapons are issued to those safe to carry a loaded, hidden firearm, no open carry of weapons in our cities, but despite all this, despite California's strong gun laws, weak federal laws undermine our efforts," said Rebecca Gonzalez, co-chair of the California Brady Campaign.

Members of the newly reconstituted Sacramento chapter of "Everytown Gun Safety" say given all the people who have been needlessly killed, they can only come up with one reason why there isn't a different national stance about guns.

"Well I think the NRA is extremely strong, the lobbyists, even the governor's response, the Texas governor's response, in his own state. He didn't mention anything about doing something. Of course we need prayers and we need to send our thoughts, but it's kind of shocking," said Rosemary Yoshikawa of  Woodland.

"We can't even get our national leaders, our representatives and our senators to talk about gun violence if they receive any funding from the NRA. The NRA has a hold on that.  So, the next election, I think the one thing we absolutely need to do to make any progress, to even have any discussions about what gun laws might be right for us is to elect a new Congress," said Grosser.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops is also taking action less than a week after the massacre in Sutherland Springs.

The conference sent a letter to Congress calling for "true debate on gun violence."