Parking Spots Scarce in Historic Roseville

ROSEVILLE -- The redevelopment of Roseville's original downtown was completed 10 years ago, but it continues to evolve.

It's less than a block from the rail stop where 10 additional trains are planned by the popular Capitol Corridor to the Bay Area.

And two apartment developments, including an 80-unit complex is planned in Old Town. But with the resurgence of business activity comes growing pains.

"If nobody can park, it's going to be difficult to make it a thriving Old Town," said Russ Yeager, co-owner of Old Town Pizza.

Yeager helps run Old Town Pizza, which has locations in Old Auburn and Historic Lincoln as well. Like other merchants, he's concerned about the shrinking number of parking spaces in Old Town.

The parking lot at the train station is full even with the limited number of trains running now. Two planned housing developments will eat up more space.
And a 100-space lot once run by the city has been reacquired by the owner for the customers of his Opera House Saloon.

"We're limited on parking," stylist Jessica Kim said.

She says customers and employees at Beauty Parlour may have to look for another place to park, which is already a challenge for new customers.

"'Is it OK if I park here? Am I going to get towed?' So there's really not an opportunity for any of the patrons coming to Historic Roseville to have a place to park," Kim said.

Over the years, the city has put a lot of time and money into sprucing up Old Roseville.

"It's in our best interest to continue to assist the existing business and future businesses," said Kevin Payne, director of development services in Roseville.

But the city's plans to build two parking structures in Old Town have been derailed, so to speak, by financing issues. They will come, but the time table is uncertain.

In the meantime, a seven-story parking garage a five-minute walk away will be open in April, although merchants say it's no help because it's located on the other side of the tracks. The same goes for a garage that services merchants on Vernon Street.

Still the city says more trains coming in will bring more business as will the housing units.

"People living there that are going to be going to the coffee shops, going to the cafes that will be there, right there in Old Town," Payne said.

Many merchants said they want to be a part of the growth of the area, as long they are supported.

"Hopefully those plans involve getting us a garage on this side or somehow getting a lot back," Yeager said.