Steinberg Highlights Sacramento’s Need to Grow in First State of the City Address

SACRAMENTO -- Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg issued a call to be extraordinary Thursday at his first State of the City address.

There was also a timely shoutout to the Sacramento-set, critically acclaimed film "Lady Bird."

"During all the terms of all my predecessors combined, the number of Golden Globes awarded to movies celebrating the greatness of Sacramento? Zero," Steinberg said.

But just two hours before his speech, Amazon announced its list of finalists to be the home of its second headquarters. Sacramento was not on the list.

"They couldn't wait another day before making the announcement?" Steinberg joked.

Steinberg addressed another piece of disappointing news - the wage gap for women and people of color.

"This week's finding that the city workforce still has too large a wage gap for women and people of color shows that we are not afraid to admit where we must improve," he said.

Steinberg called for transparency, accountability and building public confidence. He briefly gave a nod to law enforcement, but did not speak to the criticism the Sacramento Police Department has received about violent run-ins in the black community.

And on the heels of a report of a federal immigration sweep in Northern California, in the midst of a renewed DACA debate in Washington, Steinberg drew a line in the sand.

"We don't care how many 'stable geniuses' want to tell us who does or does not belong in Sacramento," he said. "We are a proud sanctuary city."

A large portion of the speech focused on the gap between what Sacramento wants to accomplish and what Sacramento has the resources to accomplish.

"We have everything going for us to become a Major League Soccer city," Steinberg said. "Our challenge, however, is clear. We don't currently have enough private capital to make our selection the no-brainer it should be."

Steinberg stressed the need for economic growth -- proposing creating a multi-billion-dollar equity capital fund -- and employment growth and real estate growth.

"We must dramatically increase supply. We must foster job high wage opportunities so that people can afford to live here," he said.

In short, Stainberg said, Sacramento must aim for the extraordinary.