Boxer Turns His Life Around, Creates Multi-Million Dollar Rocklin Company

ROCKLIN -- A 20,000 square foot warehouse in Rocklin is on top of the manufacturing world.

Titan America makes parts that launch rockets into space and take submarines to the lowest depths of the ocean, and everywhere in between. The company has been turning out some of the best computer numerical control manufactured parts the world is using today.

The owner, Titan Gilroy, has quite the story of his own. The one-time up and coming boxer actually spent time in prison before becoming the brainchild of a multi-million dollar company.

"It was all about solving the right problems for the right companies," Gilroy said. "So, we went from building ROVs, to making rocket parts for SpaceX and Elon Musk, to Jeff Bezos and Blue Origin, and basically anyone who had complex, hard parts that they weren't sending to China. I was going after the most difficult parts and thriving in that."

But even now, at 48, Gilroy would have never guessed that this would be his calling.

Born in Hawaii, he turned to boxing to keep from being picked on as a kid. He was so good as an amateur, in 1992 one of the biggest names in boxing, Top Rank, signed him to a deal to make him the next heavyweight champion.

"And then one night I went out to the wrong place at the wrong time. Fights broke out, somebody pushed me back, I hit him," Gilroy told FOX40.

Gilroy ended up being convicted of first-degree assault. He spent three years in prison and when he was released he was determined to stay out of trouble.

He took the first job he was offered at a CNC machine shop.

"I started on the machines. I was able to actually change the programs and actually increase the efficiency, the production level. So let's make the parts faster," Gilroy said. "If something is made in eight minutes, let's take it to two minutes. Then that six minutes multiply it by whatever and that's money you're saving. And when you do thousands of parts, all of a sudden the company is thriving."

Gilroy moved from shop to shop, trying to implement his ideas. He finally decided to do it himself, outworking his competition just as he did as a boxer.

"And in this trade, I have the same tenacity, that same grit to put the work in," he said. "To outwork everybody. Look internal into those machines and push their limits."

Now, Gilroy is giving back to his craft by providing free online training to anyone who wants to learn his line of work.

"That way we can touch all the lives. We can impact the entire industry instead of just hitting this many who can afford it," Gilroy said.

Not forgetting the bumpy path he took on the road to success, Gilroy is also teaching his craft in prisons across the country. He recently built an elite manufacturing training shop inside San Quentin State Prison.

"You know having come from nothing, having a shot and then shattering my entire life. You know what I mean? It's been a complete fairytale," Gilroy said.