Sacramento Kings Partner with BLM Sacramento, Build. Black. Coalition to Invest in Black Youth

SACRAMNETO -- "We needed to create a space for kids to process trauma, kids to heal," Pastor Les Simmons explained.

Simmons opening his doors at South Sacramento Christian Center Friday welcoming families with kids and the Kings to share their thoughts about Stephon Clark.

The purpose being to encourage young people in this community to use their voices now to create change.

 

Nyema Jones, 10, came with her great-grandmother Clarice Baldwin.

"So she could see what's going on. And maybe she has an opinion too. Cause she always does," Baldwin said.

And, she didn't shy away from sharing her thoughts on the unarmed father losing his life because police allegedly mistook his cell phone for a gun.

"They should have asked questions first and shot if he had a weapon," Nyema said.

Kings and Queens rise was a kick-off event for Build Black -- a coalition of community leaders dedicated to transforming black communities by investing in their education and job opportunities.

The Sacramento Kings took the first step by starting an education fund for Clark`s two children.

"It`s just a powerful piece and hopefully this is the spawn of something that`s awesome and great," said Kings legend Doug Christie.

Christie came out along with Kings player Vince Carter, who reacted to Clark`s independent autopsy -- which revealed Friday that 8 of 20 bullets fired at Clark hit him in the back or side.

"I mean, any person shot in the back you say 'wow.' And you say 'why?' And I think that`s what the movement was about. Why? Why doesn't it have to be this way? And let's change that mentality and that thought process," Carter explained.

Kings player Garrett Temple also shared his thoughts.

"This community isn't alone. A lot of people are going through this across the country. And we have to come together from coast to coast," Temple said.