Psychologist Explains Why Woman Didn’t Take Chance to Flee Captor Earlier

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SACRAMENTO-

Identifying and caring for someone, even when that someone is a violent kidnapper.

Those are characteristics shared by the most recent alleged victim of a decade-long kidnap and sexual abuse.

While it wasn’t a stranger abduction like the South Lake Tahoe case of Jaycee Lee Dugard – there are similarities.

Both girls callously ripped away for their families.

In Jaycee’s case – 18 brutally long years, in which she bore two daughters with her kidnapper, a convicted sex offender.

In Orange County,  police say the victim also shares a child with her kidnapper and had opportunities to run, but didn’t

“It’s a very unconscious, not something you’re aware you’re doing, process. It’s a survival-bonding mechanism,” clinical psychologist Dr. Mike Duveneck said.

Even evolving into assisting the kidnapper, purposely evading law enforcement.

“We’re gonna do what we have to do to survive. There’s some people that will fight, and then there’s a lot of people that get overwhelmed,” Duveneck said.

Enduring years of torture and pain.

Add threats of harm to a victim’s loved ones and she takes on the role of protector.

“When they’re young, they believe this. His guy is nasty, he’s brutal and look what he’s going to her,”  Duveneck added. “I think it’s easy to judge, but it’s very understandable that we’re gonna do what we have to do live.”

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