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Folsom Lake Higher Now Than In All of 2014

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FOLSOM-

Folsom Lake levels are now higher than they ever were in 2014 - by about 1,000 acre-feet.

"We know we're in the fourth year of a drought. We know that the snowpack is essentially at a fraction of what it normally is. We know we are going to need water later, so we are holding onto as much as we can now," said Erin Curtis with the Bureau of Reclamation.

The bureau co-manages the lake with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Folks like Kent Wright knows that conservation mindset is much needed when it comes to managing releases for the water supply.

"Disturbing," he said, when asked how the lake looked to him.

The lake is now at 572,000-acre feet or 103 percent of the average of what it's held over the last 15 years.

Still that's just 59 percent of capacity - something that concerns Wright every time he rides by.

"It scares me. It's scary," he said before taking off on a lake trail on his bike.

It's a situation not lost on Rodrigo Lopez of Sacramento who comes out to the lake often to enjoy what water view is left.

"We need the rain, because we're in a drought. Everybody's talking about it, but what can we do?" he asked.

One thing the public might be forced to do is enjoy climbing around the lake rocks this summer like the squirrels instead of playing in the water the way many are used to.

"Last year it was at about this level in May, so here we are at the very beginning of March and it's at basically peak levels. The issue is there's no snowpack and as we make releases from Folsom beach we know in May there's not going to be snow melting up in the mountains to refill it," said Curtis.

Kayla Hill's family cancelled their annual boat trip at the end of last summer when low water restricted boat speeds on the lake to just five miles per hour.

Anything can happen, but Mother Nature might just leave this part of Folsom high and dry - relatively high now but very dry later.