Oakdale Woman Discovers Claw Marks on Two Horses

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OAKDALE-

An Oakdale woman was horrified to discover what look like claw marks on two of her horses.

Gina Rosario has taken to social media to warn animal owners of what she said she feels may be a mountain lion or coyote.

"This one seems traumatized after the event. He’s been pacing a lot since it happened,” Rosario told FOX40 Tuesday.

Rosario said she noticed something appeared very wrong with one of her horses and the other she called Max last week.

"He didn’t want to walk, he was kind of shaking from the pain," Rosario said.

The attack happened when one horse was out in the pasture, the other was in a stall.

She took to Facebook to warn others like Simon Gutierrez. He found his goat and mallard duck dead last week.

"This is all I found, I didn't find no feathers or nothing else. Just the head right there on the porch,” he explained of his mallard duck.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife said it could be a coyote but are not ruling out that a mountain lion could have done the damage.

"The Stanislaus River goes right through Oakdale, and that's a major migration corridor for all sorts of wildlife,” Jason Solley, a biologist with the Department of Fish and Wildlife, said.

While the ongoing drought has dried up vegetation throughout California, DFW claimed it's not a factor that's pushing wild animals closer to populated areas.

"We haven’t had any significant increases in this type of behavior because of the drought,” Solley said.

Although the wounds are still fresh, Rosario's vet has given the horses a clean bill of health. And for the one whose a little more skittish she has placed a donkey as its protector.

"Hopefully that’ll help him feel a little bit secure,” she said.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife said there are many ways to live among wild life.

You can find more info on their website wildlife.ca.gov.