Protesters Shut Down Bay Bridge Heading into San Francisco

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OAKLAND --

Protesters shut down the Bay Bridge heading into San Francisco on Monday afternoon.

The protesters blocked off all five lanes of traffic headed westbound on the bridge near the Treasure Island exit. They had cars blocking the lanes and the cars were chained together. Some of the protesters also chained themselves together.

The protesters were demanding justice for Mario Woods, a young black man shot by police in San Francisco in December.

As 25 of them were arrested by the California Highway Patrol, demonstrators called for the resignation of the officers who fired on Woods, San Francisco's police chief, Oakland's police chief and Oakland's mayor.

Members of  Black Seed, a self-proclaimed black queer liberation collective, also held up signs that said "BLACK HEALTH MATTERS and pledged support to another group protesting in Oakland -- the Anti-Police Terror Project.

For many  the message behind the lack of movement was lost.

Donnavan Currie of Fairfield was unaware of the protest when FOX40's cameras caught up to him in Emeryville.

Luckily, Currie, who was taking an evening drive with the family, caught just the tail end of the bridge back up that lasted for more than two hour after all lanes re-opened around 5 p.m.

He only noticed traffic moving slightly slower than normal.

Bill Lewis likes to share lanes  -- not split them.

But Monday could have been a great day to change up his riding style.

"Could have gone on through," he said.

He wouldn't have been as stuck as some others, but was glad to be starting his ride home from work after the Bay Bridge squeeze was finally starting to ease.

The protesters, who were still getting booked six hours after their blockade started, will face several charges including false imprisonment for holding all those drivers hostage.

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