Candidates for Stockton Mayor Meet at Public Forum

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STOCKTON --

Eight candidates running for Mayor of Stockton met at a public forum Thursday evening to explain how they would tackle major issues in the city.

Those eight candidates are current Mayor Anthony Silva, Stockton city councilor Michael Tubbs, San Joaquin County Supervisor Carlos Villapudua, businessman and 1960's mayor Jimmy Rishwain, Stockton resident Gary Malloy, Stockton police chaplain Sean Murray, Stockton resident Emiliano Adams, and Finnegan's restaurant owner Tony Mannor.

It came as no surprise that all of the candidates said reducing crime was among the city's highest priorities, and several of the candidates explained how they themselves were victimized by violent crime in Stockton.

"Growing up in Stockton, you learn from a pretty early age how to navigate crime. I remember the first time I was shot at I was 16. Just walking down the street," Mannor said.

"I tell people all the time if it wasn't for my cousin being murdered here, I wouldn't have turned down opportunities to work at Google to come back to the city and work here," Tubbs said.

Incumbent Silva has recently introduced the idea of opening police sub stations throughout the city to get more officers out in different parts of the community.

"The time is now to make sure you are well represented," Mayor Silva said.

FOX40 stepped outside of the public forum at Stockton's federal building to see what people who live in the city thought the mayoral candidates needed to do to address crime.

"They need to add more stuff for the kids, I think that's a big part of it. Because there's nothing for young people to do out here. Showing they care about the community instead of just sitting there and saying I'm gonna do this, I'm gonna do that," one woman said.

Several of the mayoral candidates also said they planned to add youth programs and jobs to the city, in an effort to reduce crime and help the city recover from bankruptcy.

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