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Skydiving Plane Lands Upside Down after Engine Trouble

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SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY --

Wheels up instead of wings up for a Cessna 208 that ended up in a vineyard around 2:30 Thursday afternoon near the Lodi airport.

Cindy Martin was next to her husband in their new pickup when she saw something strange and tried to warn him.

"This plane's gonna hit us.  It's really low, almost to the ground, and before we knew it we felt a bump in the back of our ... truck," she said.

Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration say that bump came as a Cessna Caravan experienced some kind of engine trouble and its pilot was trying to return to Lodi airport with the 17 skydivers he had onboard.

Amazingly, no serious injuries for those bumped on the ground or flipped inside the plane.

"We don't have any real information other than talking to the pilots and people onboard. The whirly thing stopped whirling and then ran out of sky so they ended up here in the field," said Bill Dause, owner of the Lodi Parachute Center.

Dause told FOX40 the skydivers who were onboard were actually back up in the air just 15 minutes after climbing out of the wreckage.

It's an unbelievable sight for lots of folks who live in the area and for Mike Swartz who worked around pilots and jumpers at the Lodi airport for three years.

"It really caught my attention, you know what I mean, 'cause a crashed airplane is kinda crazy, but everybody's OK, that's the main thing," he said.

And since, aside from fright, a bloody nose was the worst thing a human suffered here, Martin can laugh a little about her Toyota Tacoma that took on a plane.

"It  hardly did any damage to the Toyota. Great car," she said.

"I didn't think what could have happened should we have been a couple seconds later. It could have hit the front of us and who would have known," she said.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are looking into the exact cause of the crash.