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NASA: Solar-Powered Spacecraft Enters Jupiter Orbit

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A 1/5th size scale model of NASA's Juno spacecraft is displayed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, July 4, 2016.    Juno was launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida on August 5, 2011 and is projected to enter the orbit of Jupiter on July 4, 2016 to study the planet's formation, evolution and structure. The key event is a 35-minute engine burn at 11:18 p.m. EDT on July 4 (0318 GMT on July 5), which will slow Juno down enough to be captured by Jupiter's powerful gravity. / AFP / Robyn BECK        (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

A 1/5th size scale model of NASA’s Juno spacecraft is displayed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, July 4, 2016.
Juno was launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida on August 5, 2011 and is projected to enter the orbit of Jupiter on July 4, 2016 to study the planet’s formation, evolution and structure. The key event is a 35-minute engine burn at 11:18 p.m. EDT on July 4 (0318 GMT on July 5), which will slow Juno down enough to be captured by Jupiter’s powerful gravity. / AFP / Robyn BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — A solar-powered spacecraft is circling Jupiter on a mission to map the giant planet from the inside out.

NASA mission control received a radio signal Monday night from the Juno spacecraft confirming that it’s in orbit around the biggest planet in the solar system.

Because Juno’s camera and other instruments were turned off during the highly anticipated arrival, there won’t be pictures of the key moment.

The trip took nearly five years and 1.8 billion miles (2.8 billion kilometers). Juno is the first spacecraft to venture so far from Earth powered by the sun.

It’ll spend 20 months circling Jupiter’s poles, peering through thick clouds and studying the planet’s gravity and magnetic fields.