Sacramento City Council Discusses Marijuana Regulation

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SACRAMENTO -- It was a full house Tuesday night at the Sacramento City Council meeting as marijuana cultivation regulations were discussed.

"Everybody going to be growing it, but regulate it," said Nathaniel Eddins, who attended Tuesday's meeting.

"There's language and then there's interrupting the language, so we can read, we can listen, but you need a guy to even interrupt what a lot of this means," said Jason Smith, who works for A+ Organics, a medical marijuana delivery business that has been growing.

"Every week we're getting more and more patients, the biggest growing demographic is old ladies," Smith said.

But at this point, he's not even sure if he'll be able to make recreational deliveries.

"It's a big deal for us, we need to know how to pivot if we need to pivot. So a lot of limbo right now," Smith said.

Also in limbo are those living in Districts 2 and 6, where most of the proposed commercial marijuana grow sites are.

"We don't want it so close to our neighborhoods to our schools," said Stephanie Francis, who lives in the Fruitridge Manor Neighborhood and is worried growing green plants will hurt an area of the city that is already struggling. "Our Southeast Sacramento community has not had a chance to weigh in on this."

"If the money is going to come to those neighborhoods in the way of these businesses, then let the money stay there. What the city council is saying is no all the money should just go into the general fund. It'll never come back to the community, never," said Barbara Steinberg, who also lives in south Sacramento, and is frustrated the grow sites were not evenly distributed across all city districts. "They're not going to go in East Sac, Land Park, McKinley and downtown. They're going to go in neighborhoods that are already economically challenged. And you'll never bring regular retail or residential to those neighborhoods once that happens. It just won't happen."

But Steinberg worries at this point, complaining to city council is futile.

"I don't think that my saying anything is going to prevent it. There's a lot of people here who are saying the same thing for south Sac and Del Paso," she said.