Lincoln’s Party Ordinance Goes into Effect

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LINCOLN -- There are already laws in place against buying drugs and alcohol, but a new city ordinance in Lincoln would punish adults for turning a blind eye on parties -- where those things are often found.

Claire Jordan, high school senior and vice president of the Placer County Youth Commission, says partying is part of the teenage experience -- but it often comes at a deadly cost.

"People falling out of cars, getting hit by cars. Getting stuck under cars, and that's just so dangerous," she said

Thursday, members of of the Youth Commission spoke with students at Lincoln High School about the city's new Social Host Ordinance. Lincoln is the latest city in Placer County to adopt such a policy.

If a person is caught hosting a party with kids drinking or using drugs, that person can be charged $1,000 by the city. Plus the District Attorney can also charge them with an infraction or a misdemeanor. For minors hosting these parties, their parents will be held responsible.

Rocklin and Roseville have already used their ordinances to dole out fines.

"We're actually hoping that this serves as a deterrent. That would be my view of a success, is to not use the ordinance," Lincoln Police Chief Doug Lee said.

As for parents who say, "If kids are going to drink, let them be at my home." -- Lincoln Police say that you may be part of the problem, not the solution.

"If a parent is hosting a party, you have no control of who is going to go out that side door and get in a car and drive, or be in a passenger," Lee said. "So we're doing out best to ensure the safety of our kids."

Meanwhile, Jordan plans to attend Stanford University in the fall to pursue a career in medicine. She hopes her peers take laws like this seriously to improve overall public health.