2nd Annual Black Women’s March Focused on the Question: Can I Live?

SACRAMENTO -- The 2nd annual Black Women's March took place Saturday at the State Capitol. This year's theme: #CANILIVE.

The march, that kicked off at Crocker Park and ended at the Capitol, was put on by Black Women United (BWU); a non-profit organization that is "dedicated to the education, protection and advancement of Black women."

The event featured guest speakers like MC Lyte along with other prominent figures in the community such as Valerie Spencer, Jamilah Lemieux and Pleshette Robertson. These women represent many of the intersections and communities that African-Americans are a part of.

According to Black Women United, Spencer "has worked in the arena of Social Services, focusing on health disparities as it relates to Transgender persons and others within LGBT communities for over two decades." Lemieux is "a renowned cultural critic and writer with a focus on issues of race, gender and sexuality." Robertson is  "the CEO & Founder of Sacculturalhub.com and Chief Editor of THE HUB Magazine. The website and magazine are leading sources of Black urban media that celebrates the lifestyle of African-Americans in the capital region & throughout California."

The Black Women's March is intended to bring awareness to issues affecting the women of the African-American community, particularly issues surrounding social justice, gender equality and mental health.

Sacramento native, Takarra "KariJay" Johnson hosted the event. Black Women United say she is a "nationally recognized spoken word & Hip Hop artist and her art is infused with messages of truth, liberation, and healing."

Physical and mental health is also a big part of BWU.

Flojaune​ ​Griffin​ ​Cofer, who is a research and state policy manager at Public Health Advocates, spoke at the march and said, "stress is a killer and the stereotype of a 'strong Black women' is  a coping mechanism born out of adversity and necessity."

BWU also had a booth at Sunday's PRIDE festival where they showed support for black women, who are allies to and those who are members of the LGBTQ community.