Family, Friends of Paralyzed Teen With Locked-In Syndrome Speak Out

Update: Michael's loved ones say he has been transferred to Stanford after a neurologist specialist heard their story. 

ORANGEVALE – On the Fourth of July an Orangevale teen had a stroke.

Now, Michael Trent’s family and friends are speaking out in hopes to raise enough money to be able to get the 14-year-old the care he needs.

Four years ago, Michael, also known as Mikey, was diagnosed with a fusiform aneurysm of the basilar artery. According to his family, it has grown significantly since then.

Doctors have diagnosed Michael with locked-in syndrome with paralysis.

“Locked-in syndrome, with the fact that there is also an aneurysm that’s involved, makes it so much more complicated,” said family friend Shelby Penman.

LIS is a medical condition that can follow a stroke and damage part of the brain stem. Mikey can move his eyes up and down and blink. He can also swallow and smile.

“You can hear, you can see, you can smell, you can feel but you cannot move,” said family friend Katie Karras.

“All of us are absolutely heartbroken on behalf of Mikey and his parents and his friends,” Penman said.

Friends and family are continuing to contribute to a GoFundMe page and a Freefunder page in hopes that it will help with Michael's unexpected expenses.

FOX40 spoke with Michael's aunts on Sunday.

"Whatever the doctors say is the minimum we are just praying for a miracle. That God would just work and he would far exceed everything, every expectation," said Michael's aunt Bianca Harman.

Eye charts and eye tracking devices along with training for the whole family will help Michael communicate with his loved ones. They also hope by speaking with media they can reach someone who can offer specialized help.

“If there’s anyone out there that knows of a pediatric neurosurgeon or a neurosurgeon that would take on the case because he is a pediatric patient,” Karras said.

For the longtime neighbor and close friend, Michael’s smile means everything to her.

“The joy that I got when I said something to him and he smiled, and I knew he knew that we were there fighting for him,” Karras said.