With Neighborhoods in Ruins Where Will Camp Fire Victims Call Home?

BUTTE COUNTY -- Rick Haner hiked 7 miles through the ashy remains of Paradise to know for sure if there was any reason to hope that the Camp Fire had left anything behind for his family.

It did not.

"I have nowhere to go and my daughter wants to stay, and we have to have a home," Haner told FOX40.

Along with Haner, 9,700 other single family households have been looking for a permanent place to live after the most destructive wildfire in California's history.

"Our place was two acres on a creek. It was incredible and now it's gone," Haner said.

More than 100 multi-residential units have also been lost.

Haner would have bought something new already but what one local real estate agent told him seems to be common.

"There was that one person I spoke to that said they had sold their entire inventory in a day," he said. "There are no more houses that she has available for sale."

There are houses open for families like the Haners around the fire zone, they're just the kind that you might ordinarily try to book for a weekend getaway instead of a getaway from tragedy. Through its Open Homes program, Airbnb says more than 900 hosts in the region have offered up spaces that would normally be for rent to Camp Fire victims for free.

Some are as close as Chico, others as far away as San Francisco. There's no guarantee how long such an arrangement might be able to last, but they're all a place to get started at the very least.

Haner is unfortunately used to having to start again after he lost his home and business as 2008's Lightning Complex fires hit Concow.

"It took me so long to rebuild it. Now it's gone again," Haner told FOX40. "So do I do it again? I don't know that I have it in me, truthfully."