Yemeni Mother Granted Visa to See Dying 2-Year-Old Son in California

UPDATE: CAIR confirms to FOX40 that the U.S. State Department has granted Shaima Swileh a visa to come to California and see her son Abdullah.

SACRAMENTO -- Sacramento attorneys, faith leaders and advocates are calling on the U.S. government to let a mother say goodbye to her dying 2-year-old son.

"Time is running out," said Ali Hassan. "Please help us get my family together again."

Hassan is asking the U.S. government to give his wife a chance to see their son, Abdullah, again.

"My wife is calling me every day wanting to kiss and hold our son for the one last time," Hassan said.

Ali Hassan and his son, Abdullah, in the hospital. (Credit: CAIR-Sacramento Valley/CNN)

The 2-year-old boy is on life support at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in Oakland. A few months ago, he came to the U.S. from Yemen for treatment for a genetic brain condition.

"I see him, he’s getting worse and worse," Hassan said.

Abdullah and his father are United States citizens, so they were allowed into the country.

But Abdullah’s mother, Shaima Swileh, is from Yemen. She was denied entry because of the administration’s travel ban, which bars travelers from several Muslim-majority nations, including Yemen.

"She was told she needs a waiver to be able to enter the country," said civil rights attorney Saad Sweilem. "So for the last year, she’s been waiting on a waiver and never received one."

Sweilem is now calling on the government to expedite the process of getting that waiver so Abdullah's mother can come to the U.S.

"Doctors and physicians have told us that it’s a matter of days, not a matter of weeks, for Abdullah," Sweilem said.

Hassan said he hopes his family will be reunited before it’s too late.

"My son, Abdullah, is only 2 years old. We celebrated his birthday just two days ago," Hassan said. "So I am here today for your support and help bring my family together for one last time."

Swileh is staying in Egypt for the time being near the U.S. embassy. That way, if she gets the waiver, she can hop on a plane as soon as possible.

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