NWS Meteorologists Still Monitoring Storms Around the Clock Despite Government Shutdown

SACRAMENTO -- With the latest series of storms, the National Weather Service has been working around the clock, issuing watches, warnings and forecasts to the public.

Despite the government shutdown, NWS in Sacramento is still up and running.

The aftermath of a winter storm left tens of thousands in the dark in Sacramento Sunday night.

Kathleen Winkler said the storm caused a massive eucalyptus tree to come crashing down near her Arden-Arcade home.

"It was a huge tree, it's a huge eucalyptus tree," she told FOX40. "I've been here since '71, so this tree I know has been here at least that long."

Crews quickly cleared the tree from the road.

Neighbors were already bracing for the next storm.

"I know it's going to rain tomorrow. They're predicting rain all day," Winkler said.

NWS said another storm will hit Sacramento this week.

Meteorologist Emily Heller remained hard at work at NWS in Sacramento, tracking the next round of wet weather.

"So this system will come through and then we might see a little bit of a lull," Heller said.

Despite it being week three of a government shutdown in Washington you wouldn't know it at Heller's office.

"We are considered essential employees because our mission is to protect life and property," Heller said. "So, as you can tell from the weekend system, we are trying to put out the information there. So we are staffed 24/7 still."

Meteorologists continue to provide an essential and potentially life-saving service to the community.

"I am very happy that they're open," Winkler said.

Neighbors like Winkler appreciate the information about what mother nature has in store but she hopes federal workers start getting their paychecks again soon.

"I hope that it does end," Winkler said.

The U.S. NWS released a statement on its Facebook saying, "During the government shutdown, there will be no interruption in National Weather Service forecasts and life-saving warnings on operational websites, such as weather.gov and the agency's social media platforms."

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