Officials Investigate after Measles Cases Confirmed in Butte, Shasta and Tehama Counties

BUTTE COUNTY — Public health officials in Butte, Shasta and Tehama counties are working together to investigate several confirmed measles cases.

Butte County Public Health reported Sunday officials are investigating two confirmed cases in unvaccinated adults. The Butte County patients can no longer spread the highly contagious illness.

One person in Shasta County was placed in isolation, according to a press release sent Saturday by the Shasta County Health and Human Services Agency.

According to Shasta County public health officials, the cases are related and “part of a cluster.”

Now, county officials are searching for anyone else who may have become infected. People who may have been at the following locations at the following times and who have not received two doses of the measles vaccine could be at risk:

Taco Bell on Old Alturas Rd. in Redding on March 16 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and March 17 from 6 a.m. to noon
The Raley’s Supermarket on Lake Boulevard in Redding on March 18 around 6 to 7 p.m. and March 19 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
The Shasta College 800 Building on March 19 from 9:30 a.m. to noon and 3:30 to 5 p.m.
The Shasta College Library on March 19 from noon to 4:30 p.m.
Esplanade House on East Shasta Avenue in Chico from March 15 through March 19
Enloe Medical Center Emergency Room in Chico on March 19 from 8:30 to 9 a.m.

If you were at any of the above locations during those timeframes call 530-353-5564 to speak with a public health official.

Common symptoms of measles include fever, cough, runny nose and irritated eyes. A rash will then appear on the face or behind the ears before spreading to the rest of the body. An infected person can be contagious for eight days, which includes four days prior to the appearance of a rash and four days after a rash starts.

If you may have been infected, county officials say to monitor your symptoms and limit contact with others for 21 days. Infants, pregnant women and people with a weakened immune system are more at risk for serious complications from measles.

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