Trucker Discovers Rare Albino Fawn Standing in the Middle of a Woodland Road

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LOOMIS -- An albino fawn was discovered by a trucker standing in the middle of a country road in Woodland.

The little deer has since been given the name Spirit and is recovering at a fawn rescue center in Loomis.

"A trucker was driving down in between the rice fields and saw something white in the road, swerved to miss it," said Diane Nicholas, the founder and president of Kindred Spirits Fawn Rescue.

That trucker realized the animal he just passed seemed injured, so he turned around to see what it was.

“And thought, 'Oh, it’s a lamb or it’s a goat or something," Nicholas explained.

But when he called it in, dispatch put the trucker through to Nicholas.

"We chatted, he sent me a text picture and I said, 'That’s an albino fawn!'" she recalled. "We’ve never gotten one of those in 13 years of doing this rescue."

Albino deer are extremely rare. Biologists put the odds of one being born at one and 20,000 but other scientists put it at one in 100,000.

"So every so often, a recessive gene is thrown and then you get the albino," Nicholas told FOX40.

The mysterious white deer have been in North America for centuries.

"The folklore from the Indians is that the albino fawns have very good karma," Nicholas said.

Nicholas said Spirit’s mother likely died, as a mother would never abandon a fawn so young.

At the rescue center, Spirit will be nursed back to health with milk and reintroduced to a new herd made up of other rescued fawns.

A lot of noise and commotion frightens animals like Spirit, so she’s not going to be able to be seen by the general public, but there are ways people at home can help.

"We are totally funded by donations, so we don’t get money from the government for this," Nicholas said. "It’s just kind people from the community or corporations that would like to donate."

Eventually, Nicholas said Spirit, along with her new brothers and sisters, will be released back into the wild.

"They are not released in residential areas, always out more in the wilderness," Nicholas said.

So, if you’re lucky, you may see Spirit out in the wild again.

"She should do just fine back out in the wild," Nicholas said. "She’ll do as well as the natural-colored brown deer.”

This isn’t the only albino deer found recently. Just last November, there was an adult albino deer photographed in the wild in Tennessee.

For more information on how you can help Spirit you can go to the Kindred Spirit Fawn Rescue's website.

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