Gun Owners Rush to Buy Ammo Ahead of New State Regulation

ROCKLIN -- A new state law, which takes effect on July 1, requires everyone who wants to purchase ammunition, must pass a background check and show federally compliant identification like a Real ID or a passport.

"It's a mad rush to buy as much ammo as you can right now," Rocklin Armory owner Terry Fong said. "All these people with the regular driver's license, we won't be able to sell them ammunition."

One detail is still unclear with dealers.

"And DOJ hasn't told us whether or not it's an instant background check on the ammunition or if you gotta wait five or 10 days," Fong said.

Jeff Adasiewicz is one customer who purchased more than $1,000 worth of handgun and rifle ammo before the new regulation kicks in.

"You know, it's bad enough that they stop letting us order it online last year, I think it was," Adasiewicz said. "Now, we're gonna have to register or do some kind of crazy paperwork just to come in and buy ammo for a weekend with the kids. It's just ridiculous."

Governor Gavin Newsom, a longtime gun control advocate who pushed for the new law, says the purpose of the voter-approved Prop. 63 is to keep deadly ammunition out of the wrong hands and to protect communities.

But some gun owners like Adasiewicz believe the regulations punish law-abiding citizens.

"Bad guys will always get whatever they want, right? I don't care how many laws are in place. Bad guys will always get guns, they'll always be able to get ammo," he said. "But it's just making it harder for the law-abiding citizen to go out and have fun with his family or friends, or whatever."

There have been similar laws enacted in other states including Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts and New Jersey.

However, the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence says those states require buyers to first pass a background check and obtain a license in order to buy ammo. The Giffords Law Center says New York is also developing a system like California's.

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