SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KTXL) — Gun control was front and center at the State Capitol Thursday, with Democratic lawmakers voicing support for President Joe Biden’s actions on ghost guns. 

Assemblymember Mike Gipson of Carson spoke alongside several of his Democratic colleagues. All of them were in that agreement that gun violence in California and across the nation has gotten out of control.

“Lives were taken away due to guns of mass destruction,” Gibson said. 

They commended President Biden for his executive order set to go into effect next week that would regulate ghost guns — guns made at home to avoid tracing.

Per Biden’s legislation, as of Aug. 24, ghost guns will need to have a traceable serial number, and the owners of the guns will need to go through a background check.  

“We need to make sure that we take these weapons of war out of the streets and communities, and we want to make sure we keep our communities safe,” Sen. Susan Rubio, D-Baldwin Park, said.

But critics point out California already has some of the strictest gun laws in the nation, arguing more gun control would not be effective.

National Republicans spoke out against the executive order, with Oklahoma Senator Jim Lankford saying he’s worried it will “strip law-abiding citizens of their Second Amendment rights.”

The National Rifle Association also spoke out against the effort.

As we said back in April when the rule was announced, an administration that’s truly sincere and resolute about curbing violent crime rates would do one thing: take violent criminals off the streets immediately. Yet, the Biden administration allows these criminals who kill and maim with callous and reckless abandon, again and again, to roam the streets of Los Angeles, San Francisco and other cities large and small in California and indeed across our country without fear of prosecution and punishment.

NRA

Still, Democratic legislators in the Golden State insist more gun laws are on the way.

“California is safer because of our gun laws,” Assemblymember Kevin McCarty, D-Sacramento, said.

Among the bills now going through the State Capitol is Assembly Bill 1227.  It was authored by Marin County Democratic Assemblymember Marc Levine, the legislation would impose a 10% tax on handgun sales and an 11% tax on long gun sales. 

The revenue generated would fund violence intervention programs.

“We must pass this to change the culture of gun violence in America, in California, and in our communities. Thank you,” Levine said.

Levine said his bill needs all the support it can get because the legislation requires 2/3rds approval from both chambers.