SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KTXL) — Attorney General Rob Bonta reaffirmed abortion rights under California law in a press release Thursday, following the Supreme Court’s decision striking down Roe v. Wade.

The high court’s ruling ended federal protections of abortion rights, sending the issue of abortion access back to individual states. While states are now free to implement restrictions on the procedure, officials said the status quo will remain in California. 

“During this dark moment in our country, it is important to be crystal clear: Your right to choose in California remains fully protected, and abortion within our state remains fully legal,” Bonta said in the release. 

California lawmakers recently put a state constitutional amendment on the November ballot, a move that would cement reproductive rights for residents in and out of the state.

Meanwhile, here are the protections guaranteed that remain intact under existing law, according to the attorney general: 

  • You have the right to an abortion before viability. You do not need to provide a reason for why you are seeking an abortion.
  • You have the right to an abortion after viability to protect your life or your health.
  • You have the right to confidentiality. If you are married, generally your spouse will not be notified about your abortion.
  • You have the right to obtain an abortion without parental consent. If you are a minor, generally your parents or guardians will not be notified about your abortion.
  • You have the right to have your prescription for medicine to bring about an abortion filled in a timely manner.
  • You have the right to access abortion services for little-to-no charge. Abortion services should generally be covered by your health insurance.
  • You have the right to have an abortion performed by a trained professional. Only authorized healthcare providers with proper training can perform abortions.
  • You have the right to ask your healthcare provider if they have objections to certain forms of medical care. Healthcare providers are allowed to refuse to perform abortions for moral, ethical, or religious reasons. 

The Attorney General’s office urges residents to file an online complaint if they believe their reproductive rights have been violated.