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(KTLA) – Back at the beginning of October, when California’s current water year started, the state was deep in drought following one of its driest years on record.

Nearly half of California was experiencing “exceptional” drought — the most severe category, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, which keeps track of such figures. More than 87% of the state faced at least “extreme” drought.

Flash forward three months later, a precipitation-filled October and December helped improve the state’s water problem, at least to some degree.

“The latest U.S. Drought Monitor map shows quite a bit of improvement over the last few week[s] thanks to the above normal precip in Dec.,” the National Weather Service’s Los Angeles office tweeted Thursday. “Short term drought has improved but long term impacts remain.”

Take a look at the current map:

The full California drought map for January 4, 2022. (U.S. Drought Monitor)
The full California drought map for January 4, 2022. (U.S. Drought Monitor)

In an especially hopeful sign, a tiny sliver of the top northwestern part of the state that borders Oregon is measuring as “abnormally dry,” meaning it’s nearly out of drought. The percentage (0.7%) is almost as much as the part of the state that is still in “exceptional” drought (0.84%).

Nearly 16% of the state is mired in the second-most intense “extreme” category, while about 50% is in “severe” drought.

But in yet another encouraging sign, about one-third of California is experiencing “moderate” drought. That’s the highest portion of the state in over a year in the category, which is right above the abnormally dry.

Here’s what the state looked like at the beginning of October compared to the start of the new year:

Maps show what California's drought situation looked like on Oct. 5, 2021 (left) and Jan. 4, 2022 (right). (U.S. Drought Monitor)
Maps show what California’s drought situation looked like on Oct. 5, 2021 (left) and Jan. 4, 2022 (right). (U.S. Drought Monitor)

There’s also been fairly dramatic advances just in the past two weeks, thanks to a barrage of powerful storms that brought much-needed rain and snow across the parched state around Christmas and during the last week of the year.

The last system also lingered over Southern California for days. Before, much of the state’s rain was concentrated in Northern California.

Here’s what the maps looked like before and after those storms:

Maps show what California's drought situation looked like on Dec. 21, 2021 (left) and Jan. 4, 2022 (right). (U.S. Drought Monitor)
Maps show what California’s drought situation looked like on Dec. 21, 2021 (left) and Jan. 4, 2022 (right). (U.S. Drought Monitor)

Overall, California has had a tremendous start to the water year, which started Oct. 1, 2021. In the first three months, the state has already recorded more precipitation than in the previous year, which ended Sept. 30, 2021.

As of Jan. 1, 2022, the water year volume was at 33.9 trillion gallons. During all of the 2020-2021 period, that figure was 33.6 trillion gallons.

Still, California will need sustained rain and snow through the winter for the state’s drought to show any long-term progress.

“While we are off to great start to the 2022 Water Year, these are only a few early storms and we still have the reminder of our wettest months historically ahead of us,” the state’s Department of Water Resources said in a Dec. 30 blog post. “It is crucial that we get rain and snow during those months to truly ease drought impacts.”