Iranian Americans worry as loved ones face more uncertainty amid rising tensions overseas

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KTXL) -- One day after a drone strike killed Iran’s top military leader, Qasem Soleimani, Iranian Americans living in Northern California were grappling with uncertainty.

“I looked at them thinking oh God, what’s going to happen next?” said Shadieh Mirombiny.

Mirombiny was born and raised in Iran and claimed asylum in the US at the age of 24 after her husband spoke out against the Iranian hostage crisis.

She has not been back to her home country since but continues to keep in touch with friends overseas. She said they are the people who pay the biggest price for Iranian tensions with the US.

“What’s going to happen to the people?” she told FOX40. “It’s going to make it harder for them to speak out and to continue with their demands, which is to just live decently.”

She said the people of Iran have already been hurting by crippling economic sanctions. In Mirmobiny’s opinion, the real answer to peace in the region is diplomacy — not more violence.

“Killing is wrong. It has never resolved anything long-term,” Mirmobiny said. “This is not the time that you eliminate people. Already, there is someone else in his place.”

But some Iranian Americans say terminating Soleimani sends the message necessary to put an end to further Iranian aggression.

“They have attacked our embassy so many times, so many places. Now they understand it is not OK,” said Iranian American Tagho Alereza.

Despite the threats of revenge, Mirombiny said she is hopeful the bloodshed stops here.

“It has to get worse before it gets better but I am hoping that it will be peaceful,” she said.

Iran’s supreme leader, Ali Khamenei, has already come out promising "harsh retaliation" against the US.

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