PHOTOS: Remembering Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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  • U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg gestures to students before she speaks at Amherst College in Amherst, Mass. in 2019. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
  • In this June 15, 1993, file photo, Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg poses with Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, left, and Sen. Joseph Biden, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Supreme Court says Ginsburg has died of metastatic pancreatic cancer at age 87. (AP Photo/Marcy Nighswander, File)
  • U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks at an annual Women's History Month reception hosted by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in the U.S. capitol building in Washington, D.C.  This year's event honored the women Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court: Associate Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan. (Photo by Allison Shelley/Getty Images)
  • US Supreme Court Justices (L-R) Elena Kagan, Samuel Alito, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Chief Justice John Roberts attend the Presidential Medal of Freedom ceremony at the White House in Washington, DC, on November 16, 2018. - The Medal is the highest civilian award of the United States. (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)
  • Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is seen in her chambers in at the Supreme Court in Washington in 2014. The Supreme Court says Ginsburg has died of metastatic pancreatic cancer at age 87. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg applauds after a performance in her honor after she spoke about her life and work during a discussion at Georgetown Law School in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks at Stanford University. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg leaves the stage after speaking to first-year students at Georgetown Law in Washington in 2018. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
  • The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court gather for a formal group portrait in 2018. Seated from left: Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice of the United States John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr. Standing behind from left: Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Elena Kagan and Associate Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
  • U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg listens to speakers during the inaugural Herma Hill Kay Memorial Lecture at the University of California at Berkeley in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sports fashionable shoes as she speaks with author Jeffrey Rosen at the National Constitution Center Americas Town Hall at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, in 2019. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
  • President Bill Clinton walks with Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the way to a press conference at the White House in 1993. Clinton announced the selection of Judge Ginsburg to succeed Judge Byron White as US Supreme Court Justice. (Photo credit should read DAVID AKE/AFP via Getty Images)
  • US Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg (R) holds a picture of her granddaughter with First Lady Hillary Clinton in a New York school as President Bill Clinton looks on at the White House in 1993. (PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP via Getty Images)
  • U.S. Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg greets U.S. Senators Dianne Feinstein (C),and Carol Mosley Braun (R), prior to her Senate confirmation hearings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., in 1993. (Photo credit should read JENNIFER LAW/AFP via Getty Images)
  • Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court William Rehnquist administers the oath of office to newly-appointed U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as President Bill Clinton looks on in 1993. Ginsburg is the 107th Supreme Court justice and the second woman to serve on the high court. (Photo credit should read KORT DUCE/AFP via Getty Images)
  • Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks onstage at the Fourth Annual Berggruen Prize Gala celebrating 2019 Laureate Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg In New York City in 2019. (Photo by Eugene Gologursky/Getty Images for Berggruen Institute )
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg delivers remarks at the Georgetown Law Center on September 12, 2019, in Washington, DC. Justice Ginsburg spoke to over 300 attendees about the Supreme Court's previous term. (Photo by Tom Brenner/Getty Images)
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg arrives on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. for the inauguration ceremony of President Donald Trump.  (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON – Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday of complications from metastatic pancreas cancer, according to a statement from the Supreme Court.

Ginsburg, the second woman appointed to the court, died at home in Washington D.C., surrounded by her family. She served more than 27 years after her appointment to the court.

Ginsburg spent her final years on the bench as the unquestioned leader of the court’s liberal wing and became something of a rock star to her admirers. Young women especially seemed to embrace the court’s Jewish grandmother, affectionately calling her the Notorious RBG, for her defense of the rights of women and minorities, and the strength and resilience she displayed in the face of personal loss and health crises.

Those health issues included five bouts with cancer beginning in 1999, falls that resulted in broken ribs, insertion of a stent to clear a blocked artery and assorted other hospitalizations after she turned 75.

She resisted calls by liberals to retire during Barack Obama’s presidency at a time when Democrats held the Senate and a replacement with similar views could have been confirmed. Instead, Trump will almost certainly try to push Ginsburg’s successor through the Republican-controlled Senate — and move the conservative court even more to the right.

Ginsburg antagonized Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign in a series of media interviews, including calling him a faker. She soon apologized.

Her appointment by President Bill Clinton in 1993 was the first by a Democrat in 26 years. She initially found a comfortable ideological home somewhere left of center on a conservative court dominated by Republican appointees. Her liberal voice grew stronger the longer she served.

Ginsburg was a mother of two, an opera lover and an intellectual who watched arguments behind oversized glasses for many years, though she ditched them for more fashionable frames in her later years. At argument sessions in the ornate courtroom, she was known for digging deep into case records and for being a stickler for following the rules.

A private service will be held for her at Arlington National Cemetery.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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