SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KTXL) — The Supreme Court ruling on abortion has the possibility of disproportionately affecting minorities and women of color.

A youth discussion group, with a group of about 15 teens, said they’re already worried about how the decision will impact their community.

“I want you guys to think about how that impacts our community, meaning the Black community directly,” Sarilyn Hobb, Summer Nights of Impact Program leader, said.

Following the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, tough conversations are already happening among young women of color.

“Rape statistics for Black women are higher and were also in poverty more, so that would make it so we’re not able to support our children if we are forced to have them,” Paige Blankenship said.

A group of about 15 young girls spoke openly about the mental health challenges the Black community will now face.

“Some people can be very depressed,” Zeniah Thompson said. “There’s a lot of scary moments and people can be traumatized, and I feel like that’s traumatizing, especially for the Black community.”

A 2021 University of Colorado, Boulder study found that if Roe v. Wade was overturned pregnancy-related deaths would increase by 7% among all women in the first year. But Black women would see a 12% increase in pregnancy-related deaths in the first year alone and a 33% increase in subsequent years – the highest of any ethnic group.

“Even if you have said resources, your chances of dying as a Black woman during birth are still higher because doctors don’t believe you feel pain — like they don’t believe you when you say I can’t breathe or my head hurts. That is how Black women die giving birth,” Kayla Green, Summer Nights of Impact Program leader, said.

Green doesn’t believe overturning Roe v.Wade will stop women of color or those with little means from getting an abortion.

“It’s just going to make it more unsafe, and more women are going to die seeking these different things in back allies,” Green said.

The group also worried about the effects the ruling could have on the kids born to women of color who live in states where abortion isn’t an option.

“Putting the children in harm’s way of abuse, depression as well,” Alayah Dickerson said.

The young teenage girls said they are still grappling with how this will affect women across the nation.

“It kind of makes me feel like you’re a passenger in your own life. You’re not able to pilot your own life and you have someone else running it. It’s a weird feeling, very not OK,” Justice Spears said.