CALIFORNIA, Calif. (KTXL) — So far this year California has seen just over 200,000 acres burned, 1,000,000 acres less than the five-year average at this point in time, but a build-up of fuels could see that number rise.

Built-up fuel loads can be in areas that have not seen fires this year, areas that have not seen fires in several years or areas where continued fire suppression in the region has kept fires from coming through that area.

With an extreme heat wave making its way through much of Northern California the fuel moisture level could drop making it easier for fires to start, burn fast and burn big areas of land.

In Yosemite, the Red Fire and the Rogers Fire have been allowed to burn through areas of the national park that have not seen fires in several years and have built up fuel loads.

Yosemite Fire and Aviation Management said that allowing these fires to burn through reduces the risk of large fires and promotes forest health.

 “They (Red Fire and Rogers Fire) are clearing the forest of heavy fuel loads brought on by decades of fire suppression, long-term drought and climate change – reducing the risk for catastrophic fires,” Yosemite Fire and Aviation Management said in a social media post.

FOX40 meteorologist Adam Epstein said that he hopes this chance of drier fuel loads does not result in larger fires breaking out across the state.